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How dangerous is a calibration gas cylinder?

Paul Fry

How dangerous is a calibration gas cylinder? What to be aware of and tips for handling.

Calibration gas cylinders are considered dangerous goods. But, how dangerous are they, really? After all, most gas calibration gases are classified as “non-toxic, non-flammable” gases.

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Ammonia Fact Sheet

Water Security Agency

What is ammonia?

Ammonia (NH3) is a colorless, alkaline gas at ambient temperature and pressure, with a distinct pungent odor. Ammonia is very soluble in water and forms the ammonium cation (NH4+) on dissolution in water. In the pH range of most natural waters nitrogen exists principally as NH4+. Ammonia may be present in groundwater as a result of the degradation of naturally occurring organic matter or manmade sources. Natural ammonia levels in groundwater and surface water are usually below 0.2 mg/L, but many regions throughout the world have high levels of naturally occurring ammonia. Ammonia may also originate from nitrogen-fertilizer application, livestock operations, industrial processes, sewage infiltration, and cement mortar pipe lining. During 1998 to 2010, samples from 393 private water wells in Saskatchewan were analyzed for ammonia and it was detected in more than 87% of the samples with an average value of 1.19 mg/L.

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Topics: water treatment, Gas Hazards

Occupational Hazards and Health Risks of Hydrogen Cyanide

Alex Singer

Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN)- CAS Number: 74-90-8

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Occupational Health & Safety: Ammonia

Alex Singer

CAS Number: 7664-41-7

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Risks and Hazards of Chlorine

Alex Singer

CAS no.  (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number): 7782-50-5

 

Description

Chlorine (dichlorine, diatomic chlorine, bertholite, sodium hypochlorite, molecular chlorine) is a greenish-yellow gas. It has a very pungent odour similar to the smell of bleach. Chlorine is mildly soluble in water, becoming hypochlorous acid and hypochloric acid.

As chlorine is heavier than air (approximately 2 ½ times), in areas with limited ventilation or air movement it will often accumulate and spread through low lying areas.

Liquid chlorine will evaporate into the air very quickly. Chlorine combines easily with all gases except for nitrogen and any of the rare gases (excluding xenon). Chlorine itself is not flammable but, being very reactive, it may explode or form explosive compounds when exposed to substances such as ammonia, hydrogen, natural gas or turpentine.

Often for shipping or storage, chlorine is cooled and pressurized turning into liquid chlorine.

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Risks and Hazards of Hydrogen Sulphide

Alex Singer

Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), otherwise known as hydro-sulfuric acid, sulphuretted hydrogen, stink damp, dihydrogen monosulfide, sulfur hydride, hepatic gas, sewer gas, is a naturally occurring gas. A by-product of decomposition, it is found in natural gas, crude petroleum, volcanic gas and hot springs.

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Carbon Monoxide (CO) - Gas Hazards & Workplace Safety

Matt Shaw

Gas Chemical Details

Carbon Monoxide is a colourless, odourless gas, to the human senses it is completely invisible. Carbon Monoxide is a highly toxic gas.  It is termed a toxic (blood) asphyxiant, meaning it reduces the oxygen transport properties of the blood.  Low ppm doses of Carbon Monoxide can cause headaches and dizziness, if the victim is removed to fresh air no permanent damage will result. High concentrations however, can saturate a person's blood in a matter of minutes and quickly lead to respiratory arrest or death.

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Topics: Gas Hazards

Occupational Health Risks of Carbon Dioxide

Matt Shaw

Gas Chemical Details

Carbon Dioxide.jpgDespite the fact Carbon Dioxide is naturally present in the atmosphere (about 400ppm) and we exhale it when breathing, CO2 is one of the most frequently overlooked toxic gases. Both colourless and odourless, CO2 in high concentrations poses an extremely dangerous hazard.

Carbon dioxide is heavier than air, with a density of 1.5 times that of fresh air. When it is released into an enclosed or confined space it tends to settle to the bottom, reaching the highest concentration in the lowest parts of the space.

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Topics: Gas Hazards