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      Calibration Gas Solutions for Measuring Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

      Greg Shires

      Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of a group of highly reactive gases known as oxides of nitrogen or nitrogen oxides (NOx). Other nitrogen oxides include nitrous acid and nitric acid. NO2 is used as the indicator for the larger group of nitrogen oxides.

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      Topics: Gas & Cylinder Selection, Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods, Gas Detection

      What’s happening with permissible limits for gases in the workplace?

      Greg Shires

      What are exposure standards?

      Exposure standards, listed in the Workplace Exposure Standards for Airborne Contaminants, represent the airborne concentration of a particular substance or mixture that must not be exceeded.

      There are three types of exposure standard:

      • 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA)
      • short term exposure limit (STEL).
      • peak limitation
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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods, Gas Detection

      The Dangers of Ethylene Oxide

      Lara Haidary

      Ethylene oxide is a flammable gas also known as epoxyethane oxirane. It is a colourless gas with a slightly sweet odour.

      An organic compound that consists of 3 atoms, 1 oxygen and 2 carbon.

      Ethylene oxide should be treated as carcinogenic to humans and should be used and handled with great caution.

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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods

      Risks & Hazards of Mercury

      Matt Shaw

      What is Mercury?

      Mercury is a naturally occurring chemical element found in rock in the earth's crust, including in deposits of coal.  On the periodic table, it has the symbol "Hg" and its atomic number is 80. It is released into the environment from volcanic activity, weathering of rocks and as a result of human activity.

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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods

      Disposal and Recycling of Gas Cylinders

      Paul Fry

      Recycling gas cylinderOnce you’re done with your calibration gas cylinder it’s important to safely dispose of it. All CAC GAS cylinders can be returned to us for proper disposal. Some can be reused, others cannot. No cylinders should be put into general waste and it can be difficult to find a recycler who will accept cylinders.

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      Topics: Gas & Cylinder Selection, Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods

      Xenon - Gas Hazards & Applications

      Matt Shaw

      561px-Xenon-tetrafluoride-3D-vdWWhat is Xenon?

      Pronounced "ZEE-non," Xenon is a noble gas and is odorless, colorless, tasteless and chemically non-reactive. While not toxic on its own, its compounds are strong oxidizing agents that are highly toxic.

      Many compounds of xenon are created principally with fluorine or oxygen. Both oxides, xenon trioxide (XeO3) and xenon tetroxide (XeO4) are highly explosive. Some toxic compounds created with fluorine include difluoride, xenon deuterate, sodium perxenate, xenon hydrate, tetrafluoride and hexafluoride.

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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods

      How dangerous is a calibration gas cylinder?

      Paul Fry

      How dangerous is a calibration gas cylinder? What to be aware of and tips for handling.

      Calibration gas cylinders are considered dangerous goods. But, how dangerous are they, really? After all, most gas calibration gases are classified as “non-toxic, non-flammable” gases.

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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods

      Ammonia Fact Sheet

      Water Security Agency

      What is ammonia?

      Ammonia (NH3) is a colorless, alkaline gas at ambient temperature and pressure, with a distinct pungent odor. Ammonia is very soluble in water and forms the ammonium cation (NH4+) on dissolution in water. In the pH range of most natural waters nitrogen exists principally as NH4+. Ammonia may be present in groundwater as a result of the degradation of naturally occurring organic matter or manmade sources. Natural ammonia levels in groundwater and surface water are usually below 0.2 mg/L, but many regions throughout the world have high levels of naturally occurring ammonia. Ammonia may also originate from nitrogen-fertilizer application, livestock operations, industrial processes, sewage infiltration, and cement mortar pipe lining. During 1998 to 2010, samples from 393 private water wells in Saskatchewan were analyzed for ammonia and it was detected in more than 87% of the samples with an average value of 1.19 mg/L.

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      Topics: Gas Hazards & Dangerous Goods, Water & Wastewater Treatment